Conversations with History

The Life and Work of an Environmental Historian
William Cronon
Frederick Jackson Turner and Vilas Research Professor of History, Geography and Environmental Studies University of Wisconsin, Madison

Host Harry Kreisler welcomes William Cronon, Research Professor of History, Geography, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, for a discussion of the challenges of historical scholarship. Reflecting on his formative experiences, Cronon, a former President of the American Historical Association, discusses the influence of his parents, his education, and the culture and environment of Wisconsin. He analyzes the essential features of a liberal arts education, the importance of storytelling in history, the implications of the digital revolution for research and teaching, and the contribution of environmental history to the environmental movement. He concludes with advice to students as they prepare for the future.

Leadership
Gro Harlem Brundtland
Prime Minister of Norway (1981,86-89,90-96) ,Chairman of the Global Commission on Environment and Development (1983-87), Director General of the World Health Organization (1998-2003)

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Gro Harlem Brundtland, Mimi and Peter E. Haas Distinguished Visitor at Stanford, for a discussion of her lifelong commitment to public service at the national and international level. She traces her intellectual odyssey and recalls her many roles--Norwegian Prime Minister, Chair of Global Commission on Environment and Development, and Director General of the World Health Organization. She also describes the attributes of her leadership: the combination of political skills and scientific training that she developed as she worked to implement a vision of a just society in which women's rights, global health, and sustainable development were insured.

Understanding the Global Environmental Crisis
John Harte
Professor, Energy and Resources Group and the Ecosystem Sciences Division, University of California, Berkeley

Host Harry Kreisler welcomes Professor John Harte of UC Berkeley for a discussion of what environmental science teaches us about the potentially catastrophic consequences of a failure to address the current environmental crisis. His intellectual odyssey from physics to environmental studies offers important insight into how scientists have come to understand the relationship between humanity and nature and the necessary conditions for providing a balance that insures the well being of future generations. The conversation concludes with a discussion of how the present moment can be seized to meet the challenge of global warming.

http://globetrotter.berkeley.edu/people9/Harte/harte-con0.html

Science, Climate Change, and Leadership
Ralph J. Cicerone
President of the National Academy of Sciences

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Ralph J. Cicerone, President of the National Academy of Sciences for a discussion of the challenges facing the scientific community. Dr. Cicerone describes his research interests and explains the qualities of a scientist and what makes science a unique enterprise. He also focuses on leadership in science discussing his work at UC Irvine to establish a department of geosciences and his goals as President of the National Academy of Science and Chair of the National Research Council. He reflects on his work on,“Climate Change Science: An Analysis on Some Key Questions,” which he chaired-and delivered in one month-in 2001. Dr. Cicerone also considers the problem of the politicization of the Climate Change debate and concludes with positive signs that over time the international community will confront the challenges posed by climate change.

Capitalism, the Environment, and Crossing from Crisis to Sustainability
James Gustave Speth
Dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Yale Professor James Gustav Speth for a discussion of his career in the environmental movement. Professor Speth traces his changing perspective on the appropriate response to the environmental crisis. Concluding that only a radical transformation of capitalism will save the planet for future generations, he outlines the changes in consciousness and in the political agenda that will be required.

http://globetrotter.berkeley.edu/people8/Speth/speth-con0.html